Welcome To Nenagh


Nenagh was originally a market town. Today, it is the North Tipperary county town and its administrative capital. It has a population of less than ten thousand. Nenagh was situated in the Barony of Ormond.
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Information Nenagh Ireland

Nenagh in Irish is Aonach Urmhumhan or “The Fair of Ormond”, which cites it as the seat of the Ormond (East Munster) Fair. Nenagh was originally a market town. Today, it is the North Tipperary county town and its administrative capital. It has a population of less than ten thousand. Nenagh was situated in the Barony of Ormond. This was the territory of the O’Kennedys in pre-Norman times and subsequently came under the jurisdiction of the Chief Butler of Ireland under King John. Hence, the Walters from England became the Butlers of Ireland. The town has a rich and bloody history, changing hands between the Gaelic and Anglo-Norman clans throughout. Records suggest that it was re-founded around the sixteenth century. The town and the abbey were burned by the O’Carroll clan in 1550. Owen Roe O’Neill captured the town in 1641 before recapture by those loyal to the Crown. The ruins of the Franciscan friary exist today; founded in 1252, its last inhabitant died in 1817. An old gaol and house of the governor at Nenagh are now a heritage centre, with a classroom, a forge, a dairy and a traditional shop all reproduced in period detail. A scaffold and prisoners’ cells also feature. Nenagh Castle is a cylindrical keep, and the best example of its type in Ireland. It is known to locals as the Nenagh Round. It is 100 feet high, with its uppermost quarter added by the Bishop of Killaloe in the nineteenth century. Theobald Walter built the original structure at the beginning of the thirteenth century. Walter was the founder of the Butler clan, central players in the history of Ireland. Other parts of the original property have crumbled, and much of it was lost to supporters of William of Orange who had the fortifications dismantled. All that is left of the rest are the remains of a gate house and another east tower to remind visitors of the past glories of the Butlers of Ormond.

Attractions Nenagh Ireland

Cahir Castle - Cahir

Located at Castle Street, Cahir, is one of Ireland's largest and best preserved castles. It is situated on a rocky island in the river Suir. The Castle's attractions include an excellent audio-visual show called 'Partly Hidden and Partly Revealed' in English, French, German and Italian, informing visitors about all the main sites of the area.

Carrick On Suir Heritage Centre - Carrick-On-Suir

This former Protestant church, now restored as a heritage centre, was once part of the Pre-Reformation burial ground and church site of Carrick Mor. Its interesting gravestones include a memorial to Thomas Butler, an illegitimate son of Thomas, tenth Earl of Ormonde. Dorothea Herbert, daughter of the eighteenth century rector and author of 'Retrospections' is also buried here.

Cashel Folk Village - Cashel

Located at Dominick Street, Cashel, it has a delightful series of informal reconstructions of various traditional thatched village shops, a forge and other business. It is housed within the town of Cashel, near by the famed Rock of Cashel.

Mitchelstown Cave - Cahir

Located at Burncourt, Cahir, is considered one of the most spectacular caves in Europe. The caves have three massive caverns, in which the visitor is surrounded by indescribable drip stone formations, stalactites, stalagmites and huge calcite columns.

Ormond Castle - Carrick

Located at Castle Park, Carrick on Suir, is one of the finest examples of an Elizabethan manor house in Ireland. It was built by Thomas, the tenth Earl of Ormond in the 1560s. Closely integrated into the manor house are two fifteenth century towers. It is the country's only major unfortified dwelling from that turbulent period. The state rooms contain some of the finest decorative plasterwork in the country, including plasterwork portraits. Access to the castle is by guided tour only, with a maximum number of twenty people at one time.